Pies, Cobblers, Pudding, Etc.

 


Corn Meal Pie
 
3 eggs
1 c. sugar
1/4 c. butter or margarine
1 tsp. vanilla
1 c. corn meal
1/8 tsp. salt
sugar for sprinkling
 
In large bowl, combine all ingredients. Set aside for 20 minutes.
 
Preheat oven to 350F
 
Pour mixture into 9-inch pie shell. Sprinkle top with sugar. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes.
 
Pie will turn a golden brown and will have a crackled appearance on top
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Scrumptious Chess Pie
 
1 1/2 c. sugar
7 Tbsp. margarine
2 3/4 Tbsp. yellow corn meal
3 1/2 Tbsp. cake flour
1/3 tsp. nutmeg
3 egg yolks
2 egg whites
1 1/4 c. milk
1 Tbsp. good vanilla extract
1 unbaked pie shell
 
Cream together the sugar, margarine, and meal using a mixer. Cream until the mixture has the consistency of meal. Do not over mix at this point. Add flour and nutmeg; cream well.  Add egg yolks, egg whites, milk, and vanilla.  Mix well. Set aside to rest for 1 hour.
 
Preheat oven to 400F.
 
With wooden spoon, stir mixture well, and pour into your unbaked pie shell.
 
Bake 45-50 minutes.
 
 
This slice is topped with vanilla flavored whipped cream and freshly grated nutmeg.


 
 
 


 

Chocolate Chess Pie

4 eggs
1 stick butter, at room temperature
6 Tbsp. unsweetened cocoa (see my note below)
3 c. sugar
6 Tbsp. cornstarch
1/2 c. evaporated milk
2 tsp. vanilla
2 unbaked pie shells

Preheat oven to 325F

In large bowl, combine the cocoa, sugar and cornstarch. In a separate large bowl, beat together the eggs, milk, butter and vanilla. Add your dry ingredients to the egg mixture. Stir well to mix.

Evenly divide this mixture between your 2 unbaked pie shells. Bake in preheated 325F oven for about 45 to 50 minutes. Baking time may vary.



1. If I am making this pie for a holiday dinner, I will add Creme de Cacao Liqueur. I just add 1/4 cup of that and decrease the evaporated milk called for in this recipe down to 1/4 cup. I saw in a cookbook that Almond Liqueur can be used in pies like this and I gave that a try. It was good, giving the pie a nutty taste, just like that recipe had said it would.


2. For the cocoa in my chess pies, or any pies that don't have baking powder or baking soda in the recipe, I use two kinds of cocoa. I just divide the amount of cocoa called for into two parts, using Black Cocoa Powder for half of the amount called for and Dutch Processed Cocoa for the remaining half. The Dutch Process cocoa blends much easier with the liquids, particular in recipes like this, just use a very good brand. You will not want to use "Hershey's" at all, and the other one you may find in a local grocery store is "Droste". These are OK for drinks, and if you have to pick between Hershey's and the Droste, use the Droste. "Pernigotti's" will work and "Callebaut" got the Cook's Illustrated top pick for Dutch Processed Cocoa. Using the Dutched Processed and the Black Cocoa powder will give you a much darker color for your pies. What ever cocoa you decide to use, there is no need to use the sweetened kind in this recipe above unless you really are craving a heavy sugar taste. There is plenty of sugar in the pie already and you want to end up with a nice rich color for your pie along with a pleasing chocolate taste, not an over powering sweet taste.
 
 

 
 
 Pie Crust
 
About the pie crust thing, I would like to see you give my 'easy' pie crust recipe a try. It is the one you don't have to chill at all, mixes up quickly, you don't have to knead it either. It bakes up to be so very flakey. Once you make it, you will want to use it all the time. It is the one I use for all my holiday pies.
 
 
 
Southern Tapestry Pie Crust
 
This is one of my favorite pie crust recipes and is the one I use for all my holiday pies unless a specific crust is called for in the recipe.  It is so fool proof, very tried and true. This recipe makes a wonderful flaky pie crust and chilling the dough isn't really necessary. You can mix the crust dough in the food processor, gather it together on a floured surface and roll it out immediately. It is ready to bake in just a matter of minutes.
 
1 1/2 c. flour
10 Tbsp. unsalted butter, chilled and cut in cubes
1/3 cup water....you probably won't need all of this
1 tbsp. sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
 
Place flour, butter, sugar and salt in food processor. Pulse until mixture resembles little green peas. Begin adding water, 1 tablespoonful at a time. Pulse after each addition of water.  Add only enough water to barely wet your dough. Check after you have added 3 Tbsp. by grabbing some of the dough and pinching it together. Continue adding water until you can pinch the dough together and have it hold its shape. 
 
 Pour mixture out onto a well floured surface. Gather dough into a ball. Work ball around until the ball is smooth. Flour your rolling pin and roll out to your desired thickness. I usually go for 1/4 inch.
 
Pie crust is now ready to use. For easy transfer to your baking dish, use your rolling pin and roll the dough around it.
 
To insure your pie filling doesn't leak through, brush the inside and bottom of your pie crust with beaten egg white and bake for about 5 minutes to seal your crust.

 

 
 

Sweet Potato Pie Crust
 
1 c. sifted flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1 c. cold mashed potatoes
1/3 c. melted butter
1 egg, well beaten
 
Sift together flour, baking powder and salt. Work in mashed potato, melted butter and egg.  Roll out 1/4 inches thick.
 
****This is mainly used as a top crust for chicken pies, cobblers, etc.

 

 

Sweet-Potato Pie

 

4 medium-sized sweet potatoes, peeled and quartered
4 tablespoons butter, softened
3/4 cup dark brown sugar
3 eggs, lightly beaten
1/3 cup light corn syrup
1/3 cup milk
2 teaspoons finely grated fresh lemon peel
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg, preferably freshly grated
1/2 teaspoon salt
A 9-inch short crust pastry pie shell, fully baked and cooled

 

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

Drop the quartered sweet potatoes into enough boiling water to immerse them completely and boil briskly, uncovered, until they are tender and show no resistance when they are pierced with the point of a small skewer or knife. Drain off the water, return the pan to low heat and slide it back and forth for a minute or so to dry the potatoes completely.

Rub the sweet potatoes through a fine sieve with the back of a spoon or puree them through a food mill. Set the pureed potatoes aside to cool to room temperature.

In a deep bowl, cream the butter and brown sugar together by beating and mashing them against the sides of the bowl with the back  of a wooden spoon until they are light and fluffy. Beat in the cooled pureed sweet potatoes and, when they are  completely incorporated, add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the light corn syrup, milk, grated lemon peel, vanilla, grated nutmeg and salt and continue to beat until the filling is smooth.

Pour the sweet-potato filling into the fully baked pie shell, spreading it evenly with a rubber spatula. Bake in the middle of the oven for 10 minutes. Then reduce the oven temperature to 325 degrees F and bake the pie for 35 minutes longer, or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.

Serve the sweet-potato pie warm or at room temperature.